los angeles shopping guide

Beverly Boulevard


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Meg

Meghan Kinney's L.A. shop has been around for more than five years, which indicates her enduring appeal. Most of her pieces channel a '50s feel, featuring hourglass shapes and pretty silk prints. She also turns out a pair of bestselling trousers in loads of different fabrics.
8362 W. Third St., 323-653-3972

Mister Freedom

Save for a solitary drawing of a caveman on its exterior, this vintage warehouse is completely unmarked. Inside, there's a world of meticulously sourced army/navy and workwear from the 1890s to the 1970s, for both sexes. Some of the rarer items are pricey, but there are deals mixed in too: well-loved tees, perfectly beat-up cowboy boots, and simple khaki button-downs.
7161 Beverly Blvd., 323-653-2014

New Stone Age

An early settler on what is now one of L.A.'s busiest shopping corridors, this 30-year-old spot is packed with unusual gifts. Anatomical models of woolly mammoths, shell-encrusted sailor's valentines, and Fornasetti plates are all on hand. Seek out the trove of jewelry from L.A. designers, like mini gold sabre pendants studded with rubies and ancient coins set into rings.
8407 W. Third St., 323-658-5969

Pixie Market

Specializing in designers who generally have no more than a MySpace page, Magda Pietrobelli and Gaelle Drevet's second location (the first is in New York's Lower East Side) offers a delightfully indie-pop sensibility. The blazingly white spot—replete with wall decals that say smile and neon orange footstools—is packed with punky, offbeat picks: jumpers made from geometric-print fabrics, minidresses splashed with pastel zebra stripes, and hip but comfortable shoes from the house line, Maud.
7950 W. Third St., 323-782-1718, pixiemarket.com

Presse

Zoe Schaeffer and Renee Klein, both former fashion editors, have built what is easily one of the best-looking boutiques in the city. Lucite racks are set into antique-style wardrobes; framed vintage photographs are sprinkled about; and a massive boudoir-style couch, swathed in deep peach velvet, is anchored in the center of the room. The lines they stock are just as romantic and stunning: Bruce, Doo Ri, and Vena Cava.
326 S. La Brea Ave., 323-937-1560, presseboutique.com

Satine

Jeannie Lee is a bit of a soothsayer when it comes to what people will be wanting to wear, which is why Satine, with the feel of a '70s dollhouse, is fresh and spot-on. Lee is also masterful at mixing labels and prices: There are high-high-end gowns from Thakoon, but they're arranged next to crazily patterned Tsumori Chisato tops and L.A.-based upstart Kelly Bergin's bow-fronted skirts.
8117 W. Third St., 323-655-2142, satineboutique.com

As featured in Lucky's City Summer Shopping Guide!

Sigerson Morrison

The full range of modish patent flats, woven heels, and artfully worked sandals is stocked in this sleek Third Street space. There's also a lushly appointed offshoot in the Malibu Country Mart, along with an eensy outpost of the more affordable diffusion line, Belle by Sigerson Morrison, on Brighton Way.
8307 W. Third St., 323-655-6133
sigersonmorrison.com

Trina Turk

Thoroughly entrenched in a Palm Springs sensibility (she just opened her first home goods store there), Trina Turk always makes oranges, yellows, and oversize floral prints. Her polished party dresses, tunics, and blouses are all displayed in her lattice-wall-accented space.
8008 W. Third St., 323-651-1382, trinaturk.com

The Way We Wore

These days, Doris Raymond dresses lots of stars in exquisite antique gowns for big, red-carpet events—a far cry from the '70s, when she was selling encyclopedias door-to-door across the Pacific Northwest. Back then, vintage was just known as used clothing, so she capitalized on her travels to snap up garments in the small towns on her route. Now she has a two-story empire, where a lifetime of fashion history from all eras and from all the marquee names is for sale.
334 S. La Brea Ave., 323-937-0878
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