FOR:
summer

Five Tips For Surviving Summer Thunderstorm Season

April might be a month associated with a surplus of rain, but mine was extraordinarily dry here in New York. Almost all 30 days were filled with straight sunshine, a trend that continued right on toward the end of May. The city, astonished at this surprising streak of luck, began to enjoy some of the benefits of summer early—alfresco meals, jacket-less walks along the Hudson River, sandals!—as their spring trench coats and wellies sat untouched at home.

Then, right around Memorial Day, the dreamy Garden of Eden weather abruptly ended with a series of downpours akin to the monsoon scene from Jumanji (minus the crocodile—aw, man), broken up by bouts of extreme heat. It's made getting dressed become this mind-bending game of strategy better suited to the scheming characters of Game of Thrones: if I wear the spring trench coat and wellies I bought (but didn't need) eight weeks ago, I'll sweat to death; if I don't, well, I run the risk of getting caught defenseless in a storm. Even looking at my iPhone right now, the forecast says the it may or may not rain over the next four days and temperatures will range between 66 and 81 degrees. Like, what?!

To survive all these schizo summer thunderstorms, I've devised a few foolproof methods of staying dry and looking pulled together in the face of both extreme heat and precipitation. Follow my five tips in the slideshow below and you will, too.

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Swap your full-length wellies for rain booties.

Knee-high galoshes not only seem awkwardly heavy next to summer fabrics, but also cause a great deal of sweating (ventilation is not rubber's strong suit). It's better to get a waterproof Chelsea bootie instead, which looks (and feels!) seasonally appropriate even after the storm stops on a whim. (As warm weather storms are wont to do.)
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Wear waterproof sandals if the forecast is unclear.

When the weatherman tells you to prepare for sheet-like downpours, singing-bird-filled blue skies and anything that might happen in between—again—reach for sandals made of plastic or rubber. Since they don't look like rain gear, you'll won't need to change if the storm doesn't happen.
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Never wear pants during downpours.

Now that it's actually warm enough to deal with rain bare-legged, take full advantage! After all, few things are more annoying than wearing pants with a soggy, mud-crusted hem all day.
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Carry a lightweight anorak.

It's good to have a waterproof jacket on hand during those steamy, hot storms, if only to just throw it over your shoulders as a shield from the dampness. I especially love how the utilitarian feel of this Penfield one offsets a gauzy floral dress.


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Leave your leather bag at home.

This is really important for two reasons: 1. Leather bags are expensive, so you don't want to risk water damage on yours, and 2. A big roomy canvas tote is ideal for stashing all the stuff you might need for only part of the day, like an umbrella or thin jacket.
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